Information for
Young People

Drug and alcohol misuse can be just as confusing and worrying for those who are suffering from addiction as it is to their loved ones. The effect that drug and alcohol use has on younger people is different from the effect that it has on adults. This page offers information on what the effects of alcohol and drugs are, how to stay safe, the law around them and advice to those who are concerned about addiction.

Information for
Adults

Moderation and addiction can both be unclear, especially in light of the new government safe drinking guidelines. This page offers information on substance misuse as well as advice on safe drinking and the law around drugs to those who are concerned about someone else, or their own use.

Information for
Adults & Young People

Drug and alcohol misuse can be just as confusing and worrying for those who are suffering from addiction as it is to their loved ones. The effect that drug and alcohol use has on younger people is different from the effect that it has on adults. This page offers information on what the effects of alcohol and drugs are, how to stay safe, the law around them and advice to those who are concerned about addiction.

Information on
How to get
in touch

Whether you are concerned about the relationship that you or someone you know has with drugs or alcohol, you can get help within Bracknell. The DAAT and SMART team are available to offer fast, non-judgemental and friendly guidance to those looking for support. This page also offers information on how to get in touch and how the drug and alcohol team work in Bracknell.

Worried about someone else?

Addiction is scary for the person who is taking drugs or drinking excessively, but is also incredibly frightening to their loved ones.

One of the best ways of feeling better is talking about the problem. Whether it is a sibling, parent or friend, there is always somebody that you can talk to.

For more information about alcoholism, click here
For more information on drug addiction, click here
Adfam are an organisation who provide support to the families affected by drug use: www.adfam.org.uk

 

I think that someone I know is an addict

Often there is no way to know 100% if a person you know is an alcoholic or a drug addict. However, there are some signs to look out for:

  • Suddenly missing lots of school or work
  • Change in behaviour
  • Not enjoying the same things anymore
  • Not sleeping properly (too much or not not enough)
  • Not taking care of personal hygiene and appearance
  • Withdrawal symptoms, which include: nausea, shaking, depression, anxiety, sweating, irritability, lack of appetite, headaches
  • Secrecy: deliberately mysterious on whereabouts when drinking or taking drugs, concealing the amount ingested, unexplained accidents

It is important to note that these signs are not solely those of drug and alcohol abuse, and can be symptomatic of other mental and physical illnesses.

Drugs can often be an area that loved ones of individuals are unfamiliar with.

For more information on legal highs click here
For more information on illegal substances, click here

 

Worried about a parent?

A parent’s addiction can be embarrassing, confusing and frightening; leaving their children feeling hopeless and isolated. Because of this, many young people do not reach out for help, or even talk to anybody about their issues. It is natural to feel as though you want to help a parent, but what is important to remember is that you are not responsible for their addiction, and you cannot be expected to resolve it by yourself. Fortunately, there are thousands of people in the country who have been properly trained in order to help not just those who suffer from addiction, but also their families and friends. Most of these services are free, discreet and confidential.

http://www.nacoa.org.uk/media/files/Information%20for%20Young%20People.pdf
http://www.nacoa.org.uk/media/files/Some%20mums%20and%20dads%20drink%20too%20much.pdf
https://www.childline.org.uk/Explore/HomeFamilies/Pages/Parentsandalcohol.aspx

If you want to talk to somebody you don’t know, you can call nacoa on 0800 358 3456

Also, you can call childline at 0800 11 11 or visit the website www.childline.org.uk
The phonelines are free and confidential, and will not show up on the phone bill.

If you live in or near to Bracknell, there are a number of local organisations who can support you through your parent’s addiction problems.

 

Relate offers support and guidance to under 18s online, face to face and over the phone:

Brooke House, 54 High Street, Bracknell RG12 1LL
Telephone: 01189 876 161
Email: appointments@relateberkshire.org Website: www.relateberkshire.org

 

There is also a counselling service available in Sandhurst:

Pastoral Centre, Lower Church Road, Sandhurst GU47 8HN
Telephone: 01252 873 030

 

Worried about a friend?

There are a number of reasons why a friend may start drinking or taking drugs. A lot of the time it is down to curiosity, but sometimes it is to deal with a deeper problem. Unfortunately, many people who have a problem cannot see it and can be very defensive. This can make it difficult to talk about, so it is important that you think carefully first before you decide to talk to them.

here are people who have been trained for years to help people recover, and because you are not responsible for another person’s addiction, you must not allow yourself to feel as though you are. However, there are some simple steps that you can take in order to help. You can avoid activities and locations which might allow them to drink or take drugs, for example avoiding places like the pub, or a particular friend’s house or spot where they take drugs.

It is impossible to predict how a person will recover as each person is addicted for different reasons, and will react differently; physically and mentally. If supported properly, many alcoholics and drug addicts can recover without seriously harming themselves and those around them. Sadly, other people need to lose everything before they realise how serious their problems are and begin to make things better.